Silent Symphony Of Soaring Steel: The Photography Of Margaret Bourke-White

"... industrial forms were all the more beautiful because they were never designed to be beautiful. They had a simplicity of line that came from their direct application of purpose." —Margaret Bourke-White, 1963 Few photographers, to my knowledge, captured the imposing majesty of 20th century industrialism with as much deftness and clarity as American journalist,… Continue reading Silent Symphony Of Soaring Steel: The Photography Of Margaret Bourke-White

Experimental Archaeologist Wulf Hein’s Remarks Concerning The Hohlenstein-Stadel Löwenmensch

§00 The Löwenmensch of Hohlenstein-Stadel, discovered in the Lone River valley, in Southern Germany (which was occupied from the Middle Palaeolithic through the Neolithic), is the oldest known piece of man-made figurative art ever discovered. Given this, a considerable number of theories have been developed in a attempt to explain the statuette's role in ancient… Continue reading Experimental Archaeologist Wulf Hein’s Remarks Concerning The Hohlenstein-Stadel Löwenmensch

Roger Scruton & Aesthetics: Beauty & Utility

§00 In a July 29th episode of the New Culture Forum Peter Whittle engaged in a discussion with English philosopher, author and perpetual comb-eschewer, Sir Roger Scruton on the topic of beauty. It is a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, covering everything from contemporary art to political censure. One recurring issue caught my attention, however, as deserving of… Continue reading Roger Scruton & Aesthetics: Beauty & Utility

Art & Ancestral Decision

§.00 Artistry is nothing without technicity, for the artist is nothing without his tools. Given that all tools are, at the first, conceptual, the ontological enterprise necessarily subtends both. Philosophy (as mental technicity) determines by way of an analysis of the haecceity of one's muse(s) and subjects(s), which thus determines the technical venue(s) by which… Continue reading Art & Ancestral Decision

Notes on Schopenhauer’s The Art of Literature (1893)—II

† continued from part I §.08—Our author continues, remarking upon material modalities. "Unless an author takes the material on which he writes out of his own head, that is to say, from his own observation, he is not worth reading. Book manufacturers, compilers, the common run of history writers, and many others of the same… Continue reading Notes on Schopenhauer’s The Art of Literature (1893)—II

NKTP Building Designs (1934)

§.00—The Comte de Buffon in his epigram Discours sur le style, declared, "Style is the man himself." Schopenhaur echoed the sentiment in The Art of Literature, wherein he wrote, "Style is the physiognomy of the mind." Which is to say: The philosophy of a designer is imbued in their constructions; whether a book or a building. Thus,… Continue reading NKTP Building Designs (1934)