Experimental Archaeologist Wulf Hein’s Remarks Concerning The Hohlenstein-Stadel Löwenmensch

§00 The Löwenmensch of Hohlenstein-Stadel, discovered in the Lone River valley, in Southern Germany (which was occupied from the Middle Palaeolithic through the Neolithic), is the oldest known piece of man-made figurative art ever discovered. Given this, a considerable number of theories have been developed in a attempt to explain the statuette's role in ancient… Continue reading Experimental Archaeologist Wulf Hein’s Remarks Concerning The Hohlenstein-Stadel Löwenmensch

NKTP Building Designs (1934)

§.00—The Comte de Buffon in his epigram Discours sur le style, declared, "Style is the man himself." Schopenhaur echoed the sentiment in The Art of Literature, wherein he wrote, "Style is the physiognomy of the mind." Which is to say: The philosophy of a designer is imbued in their constructions; whether a book or a building. Thus,… Continue reading NKTP Building Designs (1934)

Eckermann’s Instruction—Goethe On Aesthetic Valuation

"Taste is only to be educated by contemplation, not of the tolerably good, but of the truly excellent. I, therefore, show you only the best works; and when you are grounded in these, you will have a standard for the rest, which you will know how to value, without overrating them. And I show you… Continue reading Eckermann’s Instruction—Goethe On Aesthetic Valuation

The Canadian Snowstorm Mask (1939)

The Canadian snowstorm mask was a plastic (not glass) cone purposed for face protection during snowstorms. The hounskull-like design is peculiar and eye-catching but was doubtless effective for short trips in girding against nature's savage increase (though, it strikes me as doubtful how useful it would be for extended low-temperature excursions, both because of the… Continue reading The Canadian Snowstorm Mask (1939)

The First Book Printed In English-America

§.00 The first book known to have been printed in English-America is the Whole Book of Psalms (Bay Psalm Book, or, New England Version Of The Psalms) and was printed by Stephen Daye in Massachusetts, 1640 (20 years after the pilgrims landed at Plymouth). §.01 The New England settlers were partial to Henry Ainsworth's version… Continue reading The First Book Printed In English-America

Notes On Charles Brockden Brown: A Study Of Early American Literature by Martin S. Vilas (1904)

The interest in Charles Brockden Brown and his works arises largely from his ranking position among American Prose Writers. Hence, it is not expected that an estimate, somewhat extended and somewhat critical, of his writings is likely to become popular. No other than this, save very brief sketches of Brown and of what he has… Continue reading Notes On Charles Brockden Brown: A Study Of Early American Literature by Martin S. Vilas (1904)

Triton: R. B. Fuller’s Floating Tetrahedronal City

“The author’s city of the future consists of three triangular walls of 5000 living units apiece, the walls and base forming a tetrahedron; each unit faces the sky over a spacious terrace. The large cutaway drawing shows a huge public garden at the bottom of the interior of the superbuilding, which the sun pierces through… Continue reading Triton: R. B. Fuller’s Floating Tetrahedronal City