PDF & EPUB Editions Of The Silence & The Howl (Book I) Revised

Both the PDF and EPUB editions of the novella The Silence & The Howl (Book I) have been revised and updated to correct for minor spelling errors and improper line breaks present in the previous EPUB version.

Additionally, a new original composition titled Synnefo Isle (a soft, ethereal waltz piece) has been added to the download archive.

Circular 1/22/20

PROSE

From Fictive Dream: Delirium by John C. Mannone.

“The brick-lumps sifted through the black morph into swarms of fire ants with glassy-grit teeth.” (Delirium)

From Spelk: Letters to Dead People by Foster Trecost.

“I sometimes write letters to my father, but he doesn’t read them.”

“How do you know?”

“Because dead people can’t read letters.” (Letters to Dead People)

From The Drabble: Dreams of Unspecified Crimes by Howie Good.

“I think it was Freud who said dreams are the day’s dark residue.” (Dreams of Unspecified Crimes)


VERSE

From Caliath: To Taste of Salt by João-Maria.

“What’s it like to bow up?, that rotten soliphsism of yours by which suns dawn merely to candle your rooms…” (To Taste of Salt)


ESSAYS

From Art & Crit: “The Death of the Author” Debunked by Eric Wayne.

The belief that “the author is dead” is one of the unquestioned bad ideas that has become gospel in the art world. It’s usually just asserted — along with its companion notions that originality is impossible, and the artist’s intent is irrelevant — as if to deny it is as hopelessly naive as denying evolution. (Wayne)

From New Pop Lit: Do Awards Matter? by Karl Wenclas.

Awards ceremonies, like hall of fames– sports, music, and otherwise– are in reality highly successful PR appendages to their particular industry. (Wenclas)


 

PDF & EPUB Editions Of The Silence & The Howl (Book I) Now Available

The PDF (90 pages) & EPUB (76 pages) editions of The Silence & The Howl: Book I (a novella) are now available from the Logos Literature patreon and can be found HERE.

For those who aren’t interested in becoming patrons, the entire novella can be read (for free) HERE.

Update On Audio & The Silence & The Howl PDF

In a couple of months all audio will be gone from this site due to financial setbacks, but will still be regularly uploaded to our patreon page.

Additionally, a pdf ebook of the novella The Silence & The Howl (Book I of III) is forthcoming; all principal editing is completed and it only remains to properly format the text.

Circular 12/25/19 (Yuletide Edition)

Regular readers of the site will be aware that circulars have been few and far between of late. That is not because I’ve discontinued the series, but simply because I’ve been focused on various other projects (namely music composition and writing). With that said—Merry Christmas! to all our readers and supporters.

— K. E., Logos Editor.


LOGOS RECAP

From Matt Wildermuth, four classically inspired poems (Hubris, Prospero, Leaving Ogygia, and Ysatters-Kasja).

From Dan Klefstad Elevens (2001) – an new excerpt from his forthcoming novel, Fiona’s Guardians.

From yours truly, chapters 1 through 15 of The Dauntless Rook (a novella), the remasters of the tracks Suzerainty (a march) and Blood For Butterflies (a organ-driven leitmotif), as well as a new arrangement of the track Legerdemain (a waltz) and a short essay on the etymology of culture.

Additionally, for those interested in downloading site-published tracks, the Logos patreon-exclusive music archive is now live (and will be updated daily).


LITERATURE (verse and prose)

From New Pop Lit, the Tale of the Christmas Bear.

From The American Literary Blog, a republication of a Christmas poem, written by the Virginian, W. G. McCabe during the Civil War.


VISUAL ART

From the always colorful Examining The Odd, a vibrant, eye-catching illustration.

From PMu at the Daily Doodle, a charming Christmas tree sketch.

And a statue of the Roman Sun-God Mithras (whose birthday is Dec. 25th).


MUSIC

For your listening pleasure, a wonderful performance of Rossini’s The Thieving Magpie Overture by Jonathan Scott on the great Willis Organ of Hereford Cathedral. If the title doesn’t sound familiar to you, give it a listen and you might be surprised that you’ve heard (a part of) it somewhere before.


HISTORY & CULTURE

One of the most enduring icons of yuletide in America (and various other places around the world) is Santa Claus. When one thinks of Jolly Ole St. Nick one is likely to conjure an image very similar to that created by the American artist Thomas Nast in 1881, an illustration which Smithsonian Magazine describes as “the face that launched a thousand Christmas letters.”

From SciHub, a fascinating article on the first radio broadcast in the U.S. conducted by Reginald Fessenden on Christmas Eve, 1906.

And lastly, I recently provided the sound-design for a Monologue On Roman Satire by the talented Miss White.


 

Music Recommendations 12/22/19

Sergei Taneyev : String Trio in E-flat major Op. 31 (1910-11) – a performance on violin, viola and cello.


Vasily Kalinnikov – Symphony no. 1. – a majestic symphony.


Frescobaldi’s Toccata by Rob Dougan (Orchestral Session) – a lively, commanding rearrangement of Cassadó Gaspar’s Toccata in the Style of Frescobaldi (1925).


Sergei Rachmaninov : The Isle of the Dead, Symphonic poem Op. 29 – Andrew Davis – performed by the philharmonic orchestra; conducted by Sir Andrew Davis. Inspired by the work of the Swiss painter, Arnold Böcklin.


S. Prokofiev : Dance Of The Knights by the Boston Symphony Orchestra – one of the better recordings of the piece I’ve heard (its often played far too fast).


Froberger Suite by Marco Mencoboni – a excellent harpsichord performance.