Hath: Meaning & Usage

Hath (hæθ), sometimes heth, is a interesting word whom most avid fiction readers or students of history have chanced across. Hath comes from the Old English hæfþ (“has”) which comes from the Proto-Germanic habaiþi (“has”). In its common, Middle English and latter usage, hath is a third person, singular present tense of have (i.e. haveth) that can be used in relation to a… Continue reading Hath: Meaning & Usage

Todesregel Isle (Part I)

The wind hissed and twined like ethereal snakes above the taiga. All was silent save the cawing of crows who high-circled the heads of the prisoners on the creaking ferry and they one hundred and twenty in number, all chained and over-watched by guards who moved pendulously, left to right, machine guns at-the-ready, eyes masked… Continue reading Todesregel Isle (Part I)

Firebug

Devlin Carver heard it in the morning. The dull scratching on the ceiling that had kept him up half the night. Something in the walls... He rubbed the dream-dust from his eyes and rose and paused, listening intently. The scratching intensified for a brief moment and then fell silent. Shortly, the sound started up again… Continue reading Firebug

Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine & Ye: Meanings & Usage

In works of old, high-fantasy or historic fiction one may have chanced across the strange words: thou, thee, thy, thine and ye. Whilst most people understand the jist of the words (that they all refer to people), the way each is to be correctly (formally) deployed is somewhat more difficult. Thou, thee, thy, thine and… Continue reading Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine & Ye: Meanings & Usage

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words

E. M. Forster once said, "English literature is a flying fish." Logos has gone fishing and below provides the bounty of our catch. adscititious --- additional absquatulate --- to leave somewhere abruptly anfractuous --- winding or circuitous anguilliform --- resembling an eel apple-knocker --- (US informal) an ignorant or unsophisticated person argle-bargle --- copious but… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Middle English

Below is a resource for writers, consisting of dozens of Middle English words paired with their modern-day equivalent meanings. The list is not meant to be exhaustive of all Middle English. If there are any words you wish me to add to the list, feel free to contact me and let me know (Middle English… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Middle English

On Dialogic Consistency In Fiction

If, in your fiction writing, you can describe something in but a single word, sentence or paragraph, but choose instead to write in excess of the requisite amount for the task-to-hand, pause to consider precisely why. There are, sometimes, good reasons for writing in excess of the amount for the task-to-hand, but if due consideration… Continue reading On Dialogic Consistency In Fiction