Elevens (2001)

(Excerpt from the novel Fiona’s Guardians by Dan Klefstad)   “You count the money. I’ll count the blood.” Daniel pushes the open case of dollars toward Jesús who in turn opens a large cooler releasing a cloud of mist. The cooler is tied to a dolly. Daniel’s gloves lift blocks of dry ice, revealing pint bags labeled O negative, A negative, A positive, B positive, etc. All… Continue reading Elevens (2001)

Etymology Of Culture: Cultivation To Encapsulation

In a 1771 letter to Robert Skipwith, Thomas Jefferson included a list of books, recommended for a general private library. Amongst them, Cicero's Tusculan Questions (Tusculanae Disputationes), a series of texts concerning Greek stoicism. Of particular importance to contemporary semantics is Cicero's use of cultura animi (cultivation of souls), similar to the German bildung (personal… Continue reading Etymology Of Culture: Cultivation To Encapsulation

Silent Symphony Of Soaring Steel: The Photography Of Margaret Bourke-White

"... industrial forms were all the more beautiful because they were never designed to be beautiful. They had a simplicity of line that came from their direct application of purpose." —Margaret Bourke-White, 1963 Few photographers, to my knowledge, captured the imposing majesty of 20th century industrialism with as much deftness and clarity as American journalist,… Continue reading Silent Symphony Of Soaring Steel: The Photography Of Margaret Bourke-White

Wieland—Introductory Inscription (1798)

From Virtue's blissful paths away The double-tongued are sure to stray; Good is a forth-right journey still, And mazy paths but lead to ill.   —by Charles Brockden Brown (1798). Wieland, T. & J. Swords, H. Caritat, New York.

Amelia; or, The Faithless Briton (1787)

AMELIA: OR THE FAITHLESS BRITON. "An original novel, founded upon recent facts." The Columbian Magazine, Philadelphia, 1787. THE revolutions of government, and the subversions of empire, which have swelled the theme of national historians, have, likewise, in every age, furnished anecdote to the biographer, and incident to the novellist. The objects of policy or ambition… Continue reading Amelia; or, The Faithless Briton (1787)

The First Book Printed In English-America

§.00 The first book known to have been printed in English-America is the Whole Book of Psalms (Bay Psalm Book, or, New England Version Of The Psalms) and was printed by Stephen Daye in Massachusetts, 1640 (20 years after the pilgrims landed at Plymouth). §.01 The New England settlers were partial to Henry Ainsworth's version… Continue reading The First Book Printed In English-America