Etymology Of Culture: Cultivation To Encapsulation

In a 1771 letter to Robert Skipwith, Thomas Jefferson included a list of books, recommended for a general private library. Amongst them, Cicero's Tusculan Questions (Tusculanae Disputationes), a series of texts concerning Greek stoicism. Of particular importance to contemporary semantics is Cicero's use of cultura animi (cultivation of souls), similar to the German bildung (personal… Continue reading Etymology Of Culture: Cultivation To Encapsulation

Hath: Meaning & Usage

Hath (hæθ), sometimes heth, is a interesting word whom most avid fiction readers or students of history have chanced across. Hath comes from the Old English hæfþ (“has”) which comes from the Proto-Germanic habaiþi (“has”). In its common, Middle English and latter usage, hath is a third person, singular present tense of have (i.e. haveth) that can be used in relation to a… Continue reading Hath: Meaning & Usage

Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine & Ye: Meanings & Usage

In works of old, high-fantasy or historic fiction one may have chanced across the strange words: thou, thee, thy, thine and ye. Whilst most people understand the jist of the words (that they all refer to people), the way each is to be correctly (formally) deployed is somewhat more difficult. Thou, thee, thy, thine and… Continue reading Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine & Ye: Meanings & Usage

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words

E. M. Forster once said, "English literature is a flying fish." Logos has gone fishing and below provides the bounty of our catch. adscititious --- additional absquatulate --- to leave somewhere abruptly anfractuous --- winding or circuitous anguilliform --- resembling an eel apple-knocker --- (US informal) an ignorant or unsophisticated person argle-bargle --- copious but… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Middle English

Below is a resource for writers, consisting of dozens of Middle English words paired with their modern-day equivalent meanings. The list is not meant to be exhaustive of all Middle English. If there are any words you wish me to add to the list, feel free to contact me and let me know (Middle English… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Middle English

Crafting Names For Fictional Peoples By Geography & Ethnos

In fiction writing, it is quite difficult to come up with a name for a group of people, whether they be a tribe, kingdom, nation or empire. Yet, even if you come up with a good name, the meaning of the name bares some consideration for culture-building within your fictional world (ie. when the named… Continue reading Crafting Names For Fictional Peoples By Geography & Ethnos

Occidental Origins of Race-Theory (I)

(a) Origins & Development of Racial Thought in the Occident ♦ (a.1) Purpose of the Inquiry Racial identity is without question one of the single most important questions of any age for, to quote the historian Richard Carrier1, “All politics is identity politics2” and race is central to identity; indeed, the fountainhead thereof. The implications… Continue reading Occidental Origins of Race-Theory (I)