Fiction Circular 6/27/19

THE LOGOS FICTION CIRCULAR is a weekly series which collects independent fiction from around the web. We are consistently on the look-out for new authors and publishers—recommendations are always welcome.


§00. Editor’s note: links affixed to author/publisher’s name will redirect to author/publisher social media, links affixed to story/article titles will redirect to the site whereupon the named piece is archived. The ‘authors’ section focuses on individuals who author and publish their own literary work, the ‘organizations’ section focuses upon independent presses, lit-mags, e-zines and other literary organizations who publish fictive work of multiple authors and ‘literary ephemera’ focuses on non-prose non-fiction literature, such as certain poems, news and art theory articles, reviews, interviews and critiques. All author/publication names arranged by alphabetical order (including ‘the’ and ‘a’).


§01. Editor’s note on criteria for inclusion: a publication is considered ‘independent’ if it is self-contained and sustaining, that is to say, if it does not rely upon the staff, organizational prowess or financial backing of large corporations, academies, governments or other large entrenched organizations. For example, Sink Hollow Litmag will not be included on the list, not due to the quality or lack thereof of their work, but rather, because they are supported by Utah State University (and thus, are not independent). All works which are included are those which were read by the editor during the week of publication; their inclusion does not mean that they were published the same week as the circular containing them.


AUTHORS

From Ian Kelly, Box Office.

Sex scandal followed drug rehab, relationship turmoil ran concurrent to family fall-outs.

All of it was box office. (I. Kelly, Box Office)


From Ramya Tantry, Human Trial.

“Subject 23 is not responding. Should we call it?”,the resident asked.
“Yes. Clear it and bring in Subject 24.”, the doctor replied.
“Doctor, Why are we killing humans?”
“We are not killing.Everything is trial and error until we find a perfect match.We are creating Super-humans.” (R. Tantry, Human Trial)


From Shreya Vikram, Like Dying, Yes.

There is no death without the dying, and yet there can be no comparison between a corpse and its body. (Vikram, Like Dying, Yes)


From Steve Hart, Promise of Shaconage—Act 85: The world changed (serialized novel).

This night was still and muggy. The river flowed slowly from the lack of rain. Everything seemed hot, even the cool grass and bed of ferns upon which he rested. (S. Hart, Promise of Shaconage)


From The Dark Netizen, The Misty Stone. The story of a jungle expedition gone awry. Reminiscent of H. Rider Haggard.

“Boss, why are we rushing it so much? Why not wait until this deathly fog reduces? We have lost half our men trying to navigate the perils of this jungle in such poor visibility. All this just for a stone?” (TDN, The Misty Stone)


From Thoughts of Steel, “Nomad” (our ending was your beginning).

It’s been so long since our brief eternity passed from wonderland. (Thoughts of Steel, Nomad)


ORGANIZATIONS

From our own site, the poem The Lord of Want and the short fictions, Lanterns In The Night, The Fissure, &, Strawberry Moon by K.E.—as well as Roadkill, a short story by D. A. Estringel.

For a moment there was nothing in all the world but those eyes. The fleeing shadows unmasking a face, bloodless as the white-bone of the moon which loomed above them like the half-formed relic-egg of some unimaginable beast, aborted-fetal in the endless gyre of its galaxial womb. (K E, Lanterns In The Night)


From Examining The Odd, a republication of American writer, Clark Ashton Smith’s short story, The Forbidden Forest (1943), and Dunce by Mike Russell.

‘What’s underneath the plaster, mister? Show us!’

They swear he has a third eye under there. (M. Russell, Dunce)


From Fictive Dream, The Storm by Suzannah V. Evans. The story a town which undergoes a strange, amphibious transformation.

 When she undressed, it seemed to him that her skin was water. (S. V. Evans, The Storm)


From Gone Lawn, Home by Cecile Barlier.

Above the seat next to Jacqui, the head of my brother Guil surfaced like a puppet. (C. Barlier, Home)


From Jellyfish Review, A Great Fall by Mark L. Keats. Appears to be some of kind of political metaphor.

When it was reported on later, no one questioned how it had gotten up there, on the wall. There were no ladders or even built-in footholds. No trees to climb. Only an immense sense of presence. (Keats, A Great Fall)


From Jokes Review, Memo From Senior Management by Josh Trapani.

Hey, Team! Wasn’t last week’s mandatory active shooter awareness training a blast? Those instructors did a bang-up job. We were blown away! So glad we bit the bullet and shelled out for it. (J. Trapani, Memo From Senior Management)


From Literally Stories, Evil Is Afoot by Frederick K. Foote. A macabre tale of betrayal and retribution. That which is evil is not necessarily that which appears so.

“The night creature finds me sitting, waiting on the doorstep of the inn. It comes not as a raging monster, but as a handsome young gentleman dressed in quality and taste. I’m thankful for that consideration.” (F.K.F., Evil Is Afoot)


From Lost Balloon, Terrarium by Amanda Hays.

He never watches reality television, says it makes him feel weird to spy on all those other humans. He stares at the lizard. (A. Hays, Terrarium)


From Molotov Cocktail, Slip The Collar by Kelsey Ipsen.

The physiotherapist is pulling and tugging at me. We hear a crack in my shoulder and see that a bone has popped out of my skin. We both stare, the bone is shiny-white and oddly sharp.

“It will get worse before it gets better,” the physiotherapist reminds me, and I nod before arranging my next appointment. On my way home, I purchase a lightweight and oversized jacket to cover up my protrusion. I don’t want to offend anyone. (K. Ipsen, Slip The Collar)


From Musepaper, President Marilyn Monroe Devours Her Young by Joanna Koch.

I’m going to disappoint you. But you know that already. If I don’t, you’ll keep me around and alive. And where will that leave us? Like an old married couple. (J. Koch, President Marilyn Monroe Devours Her Young)


From Okay Donkey, Ganymede by Chelsea Harris.

The owners before us were in their seventies, stabbed in the heart and the neck by a couple high on junk, looking for money. (C. Harris, Ganymede)


From Poetry Under Cover, Traitor by Indira Reddy.

i sigh,
my traitor body,
slipping towards

evolutionary dead-end,
evokes moments
where we touched
the soul (I. Reddy, Traitor)


From Reflex Fiction, Arigatou by Max Riddington. A somber meditation on fading memory.

My dad is speaking Japanese. With a Leicester accent. He is not Japanese but was in Hiroshima during the war, after the bomb dropped, so he picked up a few phrases, none my mum ever wanted to hear. Back then he was eighteen and had hair. Small compensation for knowing every day you might die. (Riddington, Arigatou)

From Short Fiction Break, Forked Tongue by Jess Bagnall.

I try moving to shift the feeling; only to find my body frozen in place. (J. Bagnall, Forked Tongue)


From Spelk, I Love Our Voices When We Sing Off-Key by Timothy Boudreau.

I tell you we have our own light, our own suffusion (T. Boudreau, I Love Our Voices When We Sing Off-Key)


From Splonk, Drowning A Mermaid by Gerard McKeown.

I asked where all the water went.

‘All around the world,’ you said, then dived in yourself. (G. McKeown, Drowning A Mermaid)


From The Arcanist, What Do You See When You’re Both Asleep? by Christi Nogle.

It was strange at first, like seeing colors you haven’t seen before.

You’re supposed to train for several months before it’s safe to use full-time. (C. Nogle, What Do You See When You’re Both Asleep?)


From The Drabble, Riding Motorcycles by Dianne Moritz.

Driving down Flying Point

Road today, I thought

of you and me winding

up Mount Tamalpais,

dust coating our happy lips. (D. Moritz, Riding Motorcycles)


From The Fiction Pool, The Carriage by Adam Kieffer.

My forehead yawns above my eyebrows to the brown grey tufty triangle formerly known as my hairline. I can live with the grey hairs (in fact I think they are quite distinguished for a man of my position) but the thinning & the receding? (A. Kieffer, The Carriage)


From X-R-A-Y, The Call Was Coming From Inside The Cockroach by Maggie Dove (RomComDojo), a charming tale about the peculiarities of regional pride in America.

I found out that day that the real, scientific term for the legendary New York cockroach is the “American Cockroach”.

They were the same goddamned bug.

And New Yorkers still said theirs were superior. (Dove, The Call Was Coming From Inside The Cockroach)


LITERARY EPHEMERA

From Drunken Pen, Facing Rejection & Fighting Imposter Syndrome.


From the Guildy Pleasures podcast (S01 E05, 01-28-2018), Dan Klefstad reads a excerpt, entitled, Hauptsturmführer Soren, from his novel-in-progress, The Guardian.

He’s also come up with a Hollywood pitch-line.


From JPC Allen, Writing Tip—Benefits of Screenwriting.


From HorrorMadam, a interview with horror author, Nick Stead.


From New Pop Lit, The Literary Brat Pack, on the authorial trio of Bret Easton Ellis, Jay McInerney and Tama Janowitz.


From Rebecca Gransden, news on the release of her new novella, Sea of Glass.


From Silent Motorist Media, a interview with author, S. L. Edwards.


 

Independent Fiction Publishers | Individuals and Organizations

Editor’s note: A publisher will be included if: 1. That organization or individual publisher is independent (not affiliated/supported by a major institution, such as a university, corporation, government, etc), and, 2. They principally publish original narrative fiction (not poetry or fan-fiction). All publishers where applicable will feature a social media handle. Links will be forthcoming. ‘Literary’ is used in its broadest sense to mean ‘pertaining to written works of narrative fiction.’


Individual authors / publishers

Alina Hansen (poet, developing first novel) [website]

Avani Singh (horror writer, admin of blogggedit) [twitter: @blogggedit]

Benjamin Langley (horror novelist) [twitter: @B_J_Langely]

Brandon Scott (horror and thriller writer) [twitter: @BrandonScottAu1]

Brianna M. Fenty (horror writer) [twitter: @fentyscribbles]

Dan Klefstad (neo-gothic novelist, author of the Fiona series & Shepard & the Professor) [twitter: @danklefstad]

David A. Estringel (poet and short story author) [twitter: @The_Booky_Man ]

Ellis Michaels (scifi and fantasy author) [twitter: @EllisMichaels9]

fishbowlpress (fiction and poetry) [twitter: @fishbowlpress]

Garth T. Ogle (author of The Bowl of Tears and Solace) [twitter: @gtaogle]

Giovanni Dannato (author of ApostasyThe Warlord) [twitter: @GiovanniDannato]

Glahn (surrealist, short story writer) [twitter: @sexypesty]

Iain Kelly (literary short story author and novelist) [twitter: @ianthekid]

Jess Gabnall (dark fantasy and horror author) [twitter: @Jess93Bagnall]

Jess Lake (scifi and romance writer) [twitter: @JessLakeAuthor]

Joanna Koch (literary short story writer) [twitter: @horrorsong]

J. Brandon Lowery (flash fiction writer of the fantastical) [twitter: @jbrandonlowry]

Karl Wenclas (author of The Tower, writer at New Pop Lit) [twitter: @KingWenclas]

Michael Carter [twitter: @mcmichaelcarter]

N. O. Ramos (horror novelist) [twitter: @N_O_Ramos]

Peter Clarke (satirist, author of The Singularity Survival Guide) [twitter: @HeyPeterClarke]

Simon Webster (novelist and chief of The Cabinet of Heed) [twitter: @MrSimonWebster]

Steve Hart (latter-day Jack London, author of the serialized novel, The Promise of Shaconage) [twitter: @BlueSmokies]

The Dark Netizen (flash fiction author) [website]

Wicked Fables (macabre fantasy and scifi writer) [twitter: @WickedFables]

Zach Mulcahy (fantasy author, developing novel) [twitter: @ZTMbaronofurga]


Literary publishing organizations

101 Words (flashfiction) [twitter: @101words]

Aphotic Realm [twitter: @AphoticRealm]

Channillo (literary network similar to a literary netflix) [twitter: @_Channillo]

Defiant Scribe [twitter: @Defiant_Scribe]

Drunken Pen Writing (short stories) [twitter: @drunkpenwriting]

Ellipsis Zine [twitter: @EllipsisZine]

Fictive Dream (flash fiction) [twitter: @FictiveDream]

Fishbowlpress [twitter: @fishbowlpress]

FlashBack Fiction (historical fiction) [twitter: @FlashBackFic]

Flash Fiction Magazine [twitter: @flashficmag]‏

Forge Litmag [twitter: @forge_litmag]

Formercactus [twitter: @formercactus]

Gold Wake Press (literary press) [twitter: @GoldWakePress]

gn0me (experimental fiction) [twitter: @gnOmebooks]

Gone Lawn [twitter: @gonelawn]

Gray Matter Press [twitter: @GreyMatterPress]

Hagstone Publishing (fiction and crafts) [twitter: @HagstonePub]‏

Horror Sleaze Trash [twitter: @horrorslzztrash]

Idle Ink [twitter: @_IdleInk_]

Jokes Review [twitter: @JokesReview]

Literally Stories [twitter: @LiterallyStory]

Lunarian Press [twitter: @LunarianPress]‏

Midnight Mosaic Fiction [twitter: @MidMosFic]

Milk Candy Review [twitter: @moonrabbitcandy]

Monkey Bicycle [twitter: @monkeybicycle]

New Pop Lit [twitter: @NewPopLit]

OddMadLand (surreal experimental fiction) [× discontinued ×]

Okay Donkey [twitter: @okaydonkeymag]

Reflex Press [twitter: @reflexfiction]

Sinister Grin Press [twitter: @SinisterGrinPre]

Spelk [twitter: @SpelkFiction]

Story Shack [twitter: @thestoryshack]‏

Surfaces [twitter: @SURFACEScx]

Terror House Magazine [twitter: @terrorhousemag]

The Arcanist [twitter: @The_Arcanists]

The Cabinet of Heed [twitter: @CabinetOfHeed ]

The Copybook [twitter: @CopybookThe]

The Dark Calls (temporarily closed) [twitter: @The_Dark_Calls]‏

The Fiction Pool [twitter: @TheFictionPool]

The Molotov Cocktail [twitter: @MolotovLitZine]

The Stray Branch [twitter: @debbiedberk]

X-R-A-Y [facebook: @xraylitmag | twitter: @xraylitmag]


If you wish to support our work you can do so here. If you wish to contact the site administrator, you can find him online here.

Fiction Circular 6/6/19

§00. Editor’s note: links affixed to author/publisher’s name will redirect to author/publisher social media, links affixed to story/article titles will redirect to the site whereupon the named piece is archived. The ‘authors’ section focuses on lone individuals who publish their own literary work, ‘organizations’ section focuses upon independent presses, lit-mags, e-zines and other literary organizations who publish fictive work of multiple authors and ‘literary ephemera’ focuses on non-prose non-fiction literature, such as certain poems, news and art theory articles, reviews, interviews and critiques. All author/publication names arranged by alphabetical order (including ‘the’).


§01. Editor’s note on criteria for inclusion: a publication is considered ‘independent’ if it is self-contained and sustaining, that is to say, if it does not rely upon the staff, organizational prowess or financial backing of large corporations, academies, governments or other large entrenched organizations. For example, Sink Hollow Litmag will not be included on the list, not due to the quality or lack thereof of their work, but rather, because they are supported by Utah State University (and thus, are not independent). All works which are included are those which were read by the editor during the week of publication; their inclusion does not mean that they were published the same week as the circular containing them.


§.AUTHORS

From Always Trust In Books, a review of The Girl In Red by Christina Henry (from Titan Books).

The book sounds ridiculous.

The Girl in Red takes the spirit of a classic tale (Red Riding Hood), spins it on its head and injects it into a post-apocalyptic world where one wrong move could get someone infected by a deadly virus or worse, captured by the government for quarantine or the new militias that roam to lands seeking people to impart their nefarious urges upon. Red only has her sharpened instincts and calculated approach to traversing the terrains to rely on for survival. If anyone gets too close then Red does have her trusty axe to protect herself.

 

— Review of The Girl In Red


From Shreya Vikram (who never fails to impress with her syncretic poetic acumen), a number of recent pieces, including, Faith, When Dreams Die, Monster, Insomnia, Even When I Do Not Scream, I Hurt, and most recently, Faulty Taps.

“I have written this play for myself and I know how it ends.”

 

— Faulty Taps


§.ORGANIZATIONS

From New Pop Lit, a republication of Lost Face by Jack London from the similarly titled collection of short stories which recounts a gruesome tale of a Russian adventurer named Subienkow who is captured by ruthless Amerindians in the Yukon.

“It offended his soul. And this offence, in turn, was not due to the mere pain he must endure, but to the sorry spectacle the pain would make of him.”

 

— Lost Face

Also from New Pop Lit, This Is, by Sophie Kearing.

I don’t hide my sacred rituals out of malice.

 

—This Is

And further, New Pop’s debut ‘3D short story,’ Vodka Friday Night by Karl Wenclas. A gritty, multi-perspective crime drama. Full review forthcoming.

Kirk sat drinking vodka in an after hours den near downtown Detroit with a skinny black prostitute named Jakayla,  the kind of spot where if you’re white and male you’d better arrive with someone they know because otherwise they’ll think you’re a cop.

 

— Vodka Friday Night


From Reflex Fiction, A Careless Smile by Lee Hamblin.

She throws the cutting at my feet, repeats, and all the while that stupid cat of hers sits perched on the sofa’s armrest, watching like he understands all that I don’t, being more a man than I’ll ever be.

 

— A Careless Smile


From Spelk, Salt & Vinegar Tongues a charming tale of an idyllic, sea-side meeting by Steven John. I really liked this piece and hope we get to see this relationship develop in future stories.

Also…

Suntanned. Smells of seaweed. Shelters in a cave…

I suspect she’s a mermaid.

“This one will win,” I say, and give her one of my coins.

Three cherries. A hundred penny coins pulse from the machine. She shrieks and laughs. She unties the knot in her shirt-front and, holding up the hems, fills the cotton pouch. Her loose shirt shows the freckles between her suntanned boobs. I give her another penny and the same thing happens. Then I tell her we’ll lose ten pennies, then we’ll win again.

“Are you a fucking freak?” she says and tries to take my notebook. I hide it behind my back. Her up-close skin smells of vanilla ice-cream and seaweed.

 

— Salt & Vinegar Tongues

Also from Spelk the confusing, The Fabric of Tombstones by B. F. Jones.

Found this piece rather confusing. It is not explained why she resented the memory of her son nor how he died (if indeed, as is implied, he died at all). Seemed to me that for narrative coherence, the tale should have been longer. I didn’t care for it.

He calls her one evening, slowly resurfacing, rebirthed once again. She knows he won’t be there for long. He will be gone soon, forgotten by her faulty brain, and her heart will break over and over again with each one of his deaths.

Don’t call me again, son.

Don’t come over anymore.

And she hangs up the phone, killing him, one last time.

 

— The Fabric of Tombstones

Fiction Circular 9/11/18

Send recommendations of independent fiction authors and collectives to logosliterature@yandex.com


FLASH FICTION (under 500 words)

The Dark Netizen continues his project of attempting to have the highest output of microfictions of any person ever with, Border Crossing, which tells the tale of a criminal attempting a border crossing with a bag of illicit cash. One of his best. Also from Netizen, the microfiction, Bagpiper a story about not allowing peer pressure to frivolously dissuade one’s passion.

“Sivak knew getting through the check post was not going to be easy…”

New Flash Fiction Review published the fantastically titled, There’s A Joke Here Somewhere And Its On Me by Sara Lippmann. A little slice of 80s adolescence.

“MTV watched me.”


SHORT STORIES

From X-R-A-Y, Flipped by Zac Smith. A 700 word sentence about a car crash. The brisk tale’s vivid imagery should compel all of us to take more care on the road and continue developing ways to make vehicular travel safer (from my perch in the US, I’ve long advocated a interconnected, national mag-lev system to increase cost-effectiveness and reduce risk of collision) without impinging upon movement autonomy.

“Brad pinned between the wheel and the seat and the roof of the car but able eventually to wrench himself out through the busted-out window, on his back, coming out like a baby covered in glass and blood-“

Nell published the follow up to her short story, The Angelic Conversation, with The Angelic Conversation: Agnes, a titillating tale of lust both old and new. NSFW.

“His mind drifted to his young confidant. The clever, vibrant woman he had befriended a few months before. They had shared their secrets and intimate desires – and more than once he had felt himself become charged when she posted images of…”

From Jessica Triepel, The First Step, a intimate short story based upon her own personal experiences in a troubled relationship.

“Her husband would be home from work soon, the knowledge of which filled her with a sense of dread. It had been a good day, but she knew how quickly all that could change once Lothar was home.”

From STORGY, Deadhead by Victoria Briggs. A somber and moving rumination on death and family.

“Death brought with it a dizzying amount of aesthetic considerations-“

I particularly enjoyed the old-school stylings of Uncle Charlie. If Ms. Briggs is ever to write up a sequel, it would be interesting to see Charlie positioned as a more central character, perhaps even the lead.

From Terror House Magazine, The Serpent by Mark Hull, the story of a man who loses his tongue and struggles to get it back. Just as strange and fascinating as it sounds.

“When Eben Guthrey awoke, he knew something was wrong. It wasn’t that anything hurt so much as the intense sense of absence in and around his facial cavity. He took a few hazy moments at the edge of sleep to perform a few experiments. First, he tried to get his tongue to tap on his teeth. Then he tried to get his tongue to touch the roof of his mouth. Then he tried to stick his tongue out far enough to get a visual confirmation of it. When all of these tests failed, he was forced to conclude his tongue was no longer in his throat. It had escaped.”

From Idle Ink, The Great British Break-Off by esteemed writer of sad nonsense, Jake Kendall.

“Now at 48 and 47 respectively that ship had not only sailed, but in all probability arrived at its destination.”


NOVELLAS & NOVELS

Horror writer Laird Barron‘s newest novel, Black Mountain has received a hard-cover release date, May 07, 2019. The book is the sequel to Blood Standard, and marks the second entry in the Isaiah Coleridge series.

Thanks for reading. If you should wish to support our work publishing the best underground fiction and promoting independent and unsigned authors and litmags, consider supporting our work.

Fiction Circular 8/31/18

FLASH FICTION

First up, Nell of The Library of Nell published a sequence of erotic microfictions entitled The Book of the Woodsman as well as the surreal, The Book of Morpheus. Decidedly evocative. Very interested to see her future works.

“We raised our faces at octagon windows of colour, through mirrors, upending to infinity.” — Book of Morpheus, Ely

The persistently consistent Dark Netizen published the mircofic, Buster about a dog figurine that is more than it seems.

Curious Forgotten Lore has published a plethora of fascinating little fictional tidbits, most notably: a continuation of his mythos of Clod, The God Of Clowns. Perchance, in time, he’ll be the new Slenderman; if that is to be the case I just hope SONY doesn’t try and make a movie out of it…


SHORT STORIES

Lucas Barstow has published Deep Vein Trombonist, which begins alluringly, “Deep underground where sunlight can’t be seen, the ore veins glisten in the light of a candle half burned out, dripping wax onto the floor.” Whilst the opening line is intensely atmosphere and the story is interesting, Mr. Barstow often violates the show-don’t-tell edict, describing in a rather flat and matter-of-fact way what is going on and why instead of painting a picture of the actual events in motion; but my, what an ending! Highly recommended.

Also read The Stain from the The Story Hive.

“I petted the fabric, fingers tracing the sewed areas, for the hundredths time, maybe for the hundred-thousandths time by now…

It had been vibrant and colorful, with the reds and blues and yellows thoughtfully arranged on twenty to thirty-five inches. Baby animals playing under the stars and the moon. Pink hearts lined beneath those little paws. My fingertips knew all the stitches.”

Sad, taunt, eerie and moving. Highly recommended reading and the best of the week.

Also from The Story Hive, The Greater Good Protocol.

Terror House Mag published Soul Box by James McHell, a supernatural drama concerning a man whose spirit has affixed itself inside his wife’s TV. Also from Terror House, Sugar-Plum Fearless by Soren James, a sad, creepy tale about a sad creepy man.

Jellyfish Review published Smolder by Hannah Harlow, which was quite good.


NOVELLAS & NOVELS

Little to report other than that I found a old Henning Mankell thriller in a shoebox. Was titled The White Tigress (Kurt Wallander Series #3). Reading through, very good book thus far.


Tune in next time for more.

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