Navigating Between Its’, It’s & Its

Its', It's and Its are some of the most commonly used (and misused) three letter word-forms in English. To use them properly it should be understood that its' is always incorrect to use, thus anytime you see you're writing its', substitute it for either "it's" or "its" depending on what the sentence requires. It's and Its,… Continue reading Navigating Between Its’, It’s & Its

Commonly Confused Words: Cement & Concrete

Whilst cement and concrete are often used interchangeably the two words are not synonyms. Both cement and concrete each distinct materials; the common confusion likely stems from the fact that not only do the two words sound very similar, both are building materials. Cement is a granular binding powder, made by mixing limestone, calcium, silicon,… Continue reading Commonly Confused Words: Cement & Concrete

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Arcane English Idioms

A idiom is a collection of words that means something other than it would seem, or rather, a group of words whose meaning is different to the individual meanings entailed by the words themselves. Popular American idioms include: A dime a dozen (something cheap or commonplace) Beat around the bush (to prevaricate, generally due discomfort… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Arcane English Idioms

Irregardless: Clarifying A Confounding American Neologism

One of the most irascible words in the English language is the American neologism, irregardless, popularized during the 20th Century and meaning: without consideration; or, not needing to allow for; or, heedless; or, without reguard. The word is a combination of both irrespective and regardless, which raises a rather peculiar problem, namely, that both of… Continue reading Irregardless: Clarifying A Confounding American Neologism

Hath: Meaning & Usage

Hath (hæθ), sometimes heth, is a interesting word whom most avid fiction readers or students of history have chanced across. Hath comes from the Old English hæfþ (“has”) which comes from the Proto-Germanic habaiþi (“has”). In its common, Middle English and latter usage, hath is a third person, singular present tense of have (i.e. haveth) that can be used in relation to a… Continue reading Hath: Meaning & Usage

Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine & Ye: Meanings & Usage

In works of old, high-fantasy or historic fiction one may have chanced across the strange words: thou, thee, thy, thine and ye. Whilst most people understand the jist of the words (that they all refer to people), the way each is to be correctly (formally) deployed is somewhat more difficult. Thou, thee, thy, thine and… Continue reading Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine & Ye: Meanings & Usage

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words

E. M. Forster once said, "English literature is a flying fish." Logos has gone fishing and below provides the bounty of our catch. adscititious --- additional absquatulate --- to leave somewhere abruptly anfractuous --- winding or circuitous anguilliform --- resembling an eel apple-knocker --- (US informal) an ignorant or unsophisticated person argle-bargle --- copious but… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words