Installments Forthcoming For The Serialized Novellas ‘The Dauntless Rook’ & ‘The Silence & The Howl: Book II’

Publication of the serialized novellas The Dauntless Rook (which began publication in 2019) and The Silence & The Howl: Book II (a direct sequel to The Silence & The Howl: Book I, which began publication in January, 2020), will resume after the full publication of all installments of Tatter. All three books will be re-released in single-volume (ie non-serialized) format and will also be available for site patrons in PDF and/or EPUB format.

Music Archive Updates

New tracks (in wav file format) added to our patreon music archive include:

Note: Other previously published tracks will be continuously added to the archive on a daily basis. New compositions will now be uploaded to the music archive prior to publication on Logos. A ebook pdf archive is also being developed.

Music Downloads Now Available For Logos Patrons

A regularly updated archive of Logos-published music is presently under development on the Logos Patreon. All tracks in the directory will be available for download in wav file format¹ (ordered by date) for Logos patrons, exclusively; regardless of the tier of patron support.

Meaning that all directory tracks will be able to be downloaded and put on your playlist, whether you’re a $1 supporter or a 100$ supporter.

Tracks listed in the Music Directory but not yet linked indicate those forthcoming to the archive. OSTs will be listed separately (also by date). After all tracks previously published to Logos are archived for download via Patreon, the directory will be regularly updated with all newly produced tracks and albums.

Blood For Butterflies—the first track available for download—can be found here.


¹ File-type inclusion requests (for those who cannot, or do not wish to, play wavs) can be made by contacting the site administrator.

Verse & Prose Archive Updated For The Month of November

Our archive has been fully updated for the month of November (featuring new verse and prose).

The archive will be similarly updated towards the end of December or directly thereafter (in early January).

Additionally, we will be accepting verse, prose and music submissions throughout the month of December.

If interested in submitting your work, see to our submissions page for further details.

Reversing Time’s Arrow: Qubit Simulated Particle Regression

In 1927, British plumian professor of astronomy at the University of Cambridge, Arthur Stanley Eddington, developed the concept of time’s arrow, which he sought to use to better explicate the asymmetry or mono-directionality of time.

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Sir Arthur S. Eddington (1882-1944).

One year later, in 1928, Eddington described the concept in his book, The Nature of the Physical World,

“Let us draw an arrow arbitrarily. If as we follow the arrow we find more and more of the random element in the state of the world, then the arrow is pointing towards the future; if the random element decreases the arrow points towards the past. That is the only distinction known to physics. This follows at once if our fundamental contention is admitted that the introduction of randomness is the only thing which cannot be undone. I shall use the phrase ‘time’s arrow’ to express this one-way property of time which has no analogue in space.”

Researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory were, however, able to reverse Eddington’s “one-way property,” through the utilization of a cloud-accessible IBM 4-qubit quantum computer and send a simulated elementary particle back in time 1/1,000,000th of a second. Given that the researchers were working within the confines of a simulation, they obviously did not send a real particle back in time, rather, the computer mapped the dispersal and reversal of a wave.

The authors clarify the process:

“Here we show that, while in nature the complex conjugation needed for time reversal is exponentially improbable, one can design a quantum algorithm that includes complex conjugation and thus reverses a given quantum state. Using this algorithm on an IBM quantum computer enables us to experimentally demonstrate a backward time dynamics for an electron scattered on a two-level impurity.” (G. B. Lesovik, I. A. Sadovskyy, M. V. Suslov, A. V. Lebedev, & V. M. Vinokur, 2019)

This is to say, the qubits were set to function as particles which were then transformed into a wave and then they discerned a function by which the dispersal of the wave could be reversed, thereby violating the ‘simulated’ laws of physics.

Dr. Jerry Chow, Senior Manager of IBM Q Technology, remarked on the program:

“This particular research fits a category of known research that proves you can reverse operations in quantum mechanics…”

Whilst the researchers themselves waxed ambivalent on the practical, real world possibility of time reversal, it seems, at present, theoretically plausible. Whilst popular consciousness turns immediately to thoughts of time travel, in considerations of potential practical applications of time reversal, my own thoughts moved in less flashy directions.

Given that the IBM experiment reversed the flow of time one particle-wave at a time, the effects of this process on a macro level object could prove fatal for a carbon based lifeform, as, unless there was profound sychronicity of particle reversal, one could expect subatomic shredding of the test subject (depending, of course, on the scale of the reversal process). In light of these considerations, a better initial use for time reversal technology would be in space defense. Though asteroid-to-earth impacts are rare, they are regular (along cosmic, not civilizational, timescales). According to Robert Marcus, H. Jay Melosh & Gareth Collins, one asteroid the size of 99942 Apophis (370-meters in diameter) will impact the earth once every 80,000 years. It should also be noted that a asteroid does not have to directly impact earth to pose a threat to human settlements; for example, Apophis is predicted to pass 19,400 miles (31,200 kilometres) from earth, April 13, 2029; no direct impact will be made, but there is potential for indirect impact if a chuck of the object breaks off and makes it through the atmosphere. Further, the deeper our species presses into space, the greater the threat of asteroid impact, thus, space detection and defense systems are indispensable and will become only more so. Thus, if a sufficiently large apparatus generating time reversal fields could be strategically deployed, then, theoretically, future civilizations would be able to loop asteroids by throwing them back in time to just before contact with the field whereupon they would promptly re-strike the field, engendering object-stasis so long as the theoretical apparatus remained properly maintained. If the reversal process proves uneven, such that whole object transition is (then-yet) impossible, then it can still be used to tear a potentially threatening asteroid to pieces by ‘punching’ backward holes in the hazardous object thereby stretching it out along its owner previous trajectory (the arrow’s wake) and thus leaving the portion of the asteroid still tumbling along with our arrow, significantly degraded in mass and momentum so as to be rendered harmless to human habitation.

merlin_153689052_23c9440c-f683-40b2-8511-a733881c1933-superJumbo-ConvertImage.jpg
Four-qubit superconducting square circuit of a IBM quantum computer.


Sources

  1. A. S. Eddington. (1928) The Nature of the Physical World. NY; The Macmillan Company.
  2. Dennis Overbye. (2019) For a Split Second, a Quantum Computer Made History Go Backward. The New York Times.
  3. G. B. Lesovik et al. (2019) Arrow of time and its reversal on the IBM quantum computer. Nautre.
  4. Robert Marcus; H. Jay Melosh & Gareth Collins. (2010) Earth Impact Effects Program. Imperial College London / Purdue University.
  5. Tristan Greene. (2019) See you earlier: Physicists sent a (simulated) particle back in time. The Next Web. 

The Singularity Survival Guide, by Peter Clarke, Now Available in Paperback & Kindle

Peter Clarke’s latest novella, The Singularity Survival Guide, is now available in paperback from Logos Literature.

The book has received a warm reception thus far; author, entrepreneur and political activist, Zoltan Istvan said of the work, “The technological singularity has officially been treated to a full-scale parody, and it’s even more comical and irreverent than it sounds.”

Final SSG
Cover art by Mark Dwyer, illustrations by Jack Roberts.

You can find the book online here and follow the author online here.

Fiction Circular 1/24/19

“Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.” — Mark Twain

INDEPENDENT AUTHORS

First up, Peter Midnight from The Storyhive.

The wings of the angel might belong to the angel of death… — The Storyhive, Peter Midnight

From the inimitable J. Brandon Lowry, the short story, The Dredger (2018), a peculiar tale of a reckless scientist tasked with investigating a dangerous bat cave. Its a fascinating tale (especially since I can’t ever recall reading a story that made guano scary) and exceptionally well written, as ominous as it is uplifting. Considering that it is an abridged version of the story it will be interesting to read the unabridged version whenever it comes out.

“-it is within such tales that we stare death in its cold, empty eyes and rejoice that we are indeed still alive.” — J. Brandon Lowry, The Dredger

Also well worth reading, Break Up, Break Down, & Break Face by , a moving story of betrayal, loss and the value and rarity of loyalty.

“No,” she said.

It took a moment for the words to sink in. This wasn’t right. That’s not how it goes. I opened my mouth to say something. Anything. Nothing came out. I closed my mouth. Opened it. Closed it. Like a fucking Hungry Hippo. Grasping for the right words. The plastic pill to change her answer.

“Get up. You’re making a scene. And put that thing away,” the disgust on her face was plain to see. — P. Blake, Break Up…

And lastly, Between The Stars by Sable Whisper, a gripping, slow-boiling space-thriller.

The twenty-four crewmembers of Icarus-3 were all dead.

Telemetry from their personal monitors no vital signs, but the ship’s own systems had been locked, so even Control could not gain access; no remote control or data capture would be possible. Only its location was available, one of the few things almost impossible to conceal from Command.

And so, the case had fallen to me. — S. Whisper, Between The Stars

INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS

From 101 Words, The Tome by Justin Williams. Excellent flash fiction.

“I’m in this book…?”

“Everyone is.” — J. Williams, The Tome

From X-R-A-Y, Jon Berger debuts his heady short story, Plant Replant detailing the psychosis of drug culture.

“The next morning I’m driving back to my Grandmas still high and cozy, speeding down the bumpy road in my 98’ Bonneville with too many miles on it. Gridded up farm fields on all sides. These giant white windmills were being built in the middle of the fields to collect energy. Looking like Godzilla seagulls waving around lost with nothing to break.” — J. Berger, Plant Replant

From Terror House Magazine; Punchline by Michael Carter. A delirious and beautifully written piece of flash fiction.

Perhaps an office worker could awaken from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed into an insect; perhaps a jilted girl’s unhappiness could flood the world with tears. — M. Carter, Punchline

LITERARY EPHEMERA

Wrestling reviewer and short fiction author, Baron Zach M., announces that his novel is well-underway. We’re looking forward to reading it.

The true-crime film Gosnell, which follows the trial of serial killer abortionist, Kermit Gosnell, hit #1 in New Drama on Amazon; a book of the same name is available on Amazon. Gosnell crimes received very little coverage and even after he was put away, few enough know his name or deeds which was likely a consequence of the political atmosphere which looked upon any vocal opposition to abortion as being against women (and since most of Gosnell’s “patients” were black, one was likely to be called not just a woman-hater, but a “racist” as well). It is therefore fortunate that this sordid episode has received such a thorough treatment, that it may better elucidate many of the frequent (and frequently unremarked upon) horrors of the abortion industry and those who aid and abet it.

Lastly, Mick Ryan has a fascinating article up concerning the usefulness of sci-fi to real-world military thought and practice.

Reading science fiction reinforces the enduring nature of war.  Finally, science fiction permits us to test the principles of war in force design.  Based on two millennia (or more) of human conflict, science fiction can provide another framework to assess the continuing value of these principles, and the enduring nature of war as described by Clausewitz.  — M. Ryan, Science Fiction, JPME & The Australian Defense College

END NOTES

Thanks for reading. We’re always happy to take recommendations for authors and publishers to include in our weekly circular, if you know any, feel free to email us (logosliterature@yandex.com) or write to the site administrator directly.

If so inclined, you can support our work here.