Short Glossary Of Musical Terminology

Given the amount of music which has been published on this site of late, I thought it prudent to briefly list and explain some common muscial terms.


12″ – twelve-inch single (a type of gramophone record).

adagio – a down-tempo passage / a comparatively slow piece (60-80 bpm).

allegro – a up-tempo passage / a comparatively fast piece (120-168 bpm).

arr. (arrangement) – denotes that a track has more than one variation (ie. as of this writing, the track ‘Legerdemain’ has two variations: a piano arr. and a chamber arr.).

chamber – like a classical chamber piece (similar to an orchestral piece, but with fewer instruments).

fugue – a piece that, in its main structure, repeats a theme or themes with variation.

leitmotif – a short motif (theme).

orchestral – like a live or simulated orchestra (similar to ‘chamber’ but with more instruments).

presto – a very fast passage (168-200 bpm).

remaster[ed] – a track that has been subjected to a complete sound-quality modification.

toccata – (from toccare, “to touch”) a piece for keyboard (organ, harpsichord or piano) characterized by intricate variation, swift runs, high harmonies and speed.


All music published to the site is available for download via the Logos Patreon Music Archive.

 

 

Simple Schema For Fiction Note-Keeping

§.00 I’m very partial to note-keeping and have consequently developed a note-keeping method specifically tailored for fiction.

§.01 Consideration in my schema is first given to character(s), since once one has assembled their principal character or characters, the setting and plot can be developed more naturally. Next, principal setting(s), then theme(s) (since once one has the setting and character the theme will be able to be developed, but not before, unless one is writing story expressed primarily as a internal monologue), plot(s) (as one needs the characters, setting and theme before the plot, of necessity) and finally dialogue(s). The aforementioned entries can be ordered in the way the author finds most desirable but this was the order which works best with my own process.

§.02 Outline of written schema:

  1. CHARACTER(S)—a. character 1. b. character 2. c. character 3. d. etc…
  2. SETTING(S)—a. primary setting. b. secondary setting. c. tertiary setting…
  3. THEME(S)—a. primary theme. b. secondary theme. c. tertiary theme…
  4. PLOT(S)—a. primary plot line. b. side-plots…
  5. DIALOGUE(S)—a. narration and/or character 1: “[dialogue].” b. n/character 2: “[dialogue II].” c. n/character…

§.03 Regardless of the original manner in which the schema is created (word processor, paperback journal, etc) it is important to secure a back up (as one would with a manuscript) via cloud storage services, jump-drives and print-copies/scans.