The Highly Selective Dictionary For The Extraordinarily Literate (1997)

"The Highly Selective Dictionary can be thought of as an antidote to the ongoing, poisonous effects wrought by the forces of linguistic darkness—aided by permissive lexicographers who blithely acquiesce to the depredations of unrestrained language butchers."   —Eugene Ehrlich, Preface to The Highly Selective Dictionary For The Extraordinarily Literate. Eugene Ehrlich's The Highly Selective Dictionary… Continue reading The Highly Selective Dictionary For The Extraordinarily Literate (1997)

Commonly Confused Words: Demur & Demure

Though demur and demure look similar and are pronounced similarly (sometimes the same),  each have a completely different meaning. Demur (verb) means: to object, or, take exception.  | "Aren't you going to try some fruitcake?" He demurred, recoiling from his dish with disgust, "You expect me to eat this? What are you trying to do, kill… Continue reading Commonly Confused Words: Demur & Demure

Commonly Confused Words: Cement & Concrete

Whilst cement and concrete are often used interchangeably the two words are not synonyms. Both cement and concrete each distinct materials; the common confusion likely stems from the fact that not only do the two words sound very similar, both are building materials. Cement is a granular binding powder, made by mixing limestone, calcium, silicon,… Continue reading Commonly Confused Words: Cement & Concrete

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Arcane English Idioms

A idiom is a collection of words that means something other than it would seem, or rather, a group of words whose meaning is different to the individual meanings entailed by the words themselves. Popular American idioms include: A dime a dozen (something cheap or commonplace) Beat around the bush (to prevaricate, generally due discomfort… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Arcane English Idioms

Irregardless: Clarifying A Confounding American Neologism

One of the most irascible words in the English language is the American neologism, irregardless, popularized during the 20th Century and meaning: without consideration; or, not needing to allow for; or, heedless; or, without reguard. The word is a combination of both irrespective and regardless, which raises a rather peculiar problem, namely, that both of… Continue reading Irregardless: Clarifying A Confounding American Neologism

Hath: Meaning & Usage

Hath (hæθ), sometimes heth, is a interesting word whom most avid fiction readers or students of history have chanced across. Hath comes from the Old English hæfþ (“has”) which comes from the Proto-Germanic habaiþi (“has”). In its common, Middle English and latter usage, hath is a third person, singular present tense of have (i.e. haveth) that can be used in relation to a… Continue reading Hath: Meaning & Usage

Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words

E. M. Forster once said, "English literature is a flying fish." Logos has gone fishing and below provides the bounty of our catch. adscititious --- additional absquatulate --- to leave somewhere abruptly anfractuous --- winding or circuitous anguilliform --- resembling an eel apple-knocker --- (US informal) an ignorant or unsophisticated person argle-bargle --- copious but… Continue reading Fiction Writer’s Compendium: Rare English Words